Echo is an events listing and news site for left wing culture and politics in Greater Manchester. read more…

Upcoming events

Ongoing

ends
Wed 26 Jul

Saturday, 27th May 2017

All day until
Sunday

Developing Personal Resilience - Creating Thriving Groups

A free non-residential weekend course for people working for social and environmental justice - whether you call yourself an activist or campaigner or not, paid or unpaid - to learn together how to sustain ourselves in our struggles for a just, peaceful, and healthy world. Over the weekend we will:

• Learn ways to work together supportively and effectively;
• Practice skills for looking after ourselves in difficult times;
• Create a temporary community to support each other and learn together.

Participants must be able to come to both days, including eating together early on Saturday evening (food provided). Booking / application essential (deadline 2nd May): tinyurl.com/resilience-course - tell us about yourself and why you want to take part. For people who want to make their movements, support work, campaigns more sustainable, and even joyous!

Monday, 5th June 2017

19:00 – 21:00

Manchester Palestine Action Monthly Meeting

Manchester Palestine Action is a network of people in Manchester taking creative action against Israeli apartheid through BDS and other effective, participatory Palestine solidarity work.

This is our monthly planning meeting, all friends of Palestine welcome!

Wednesday, 7th June 2017

14:00 – 15:00

Stephen Mustchin talk - Strikes, workplace occupations and 'the right to share hardship'; engineering trade unionism and the 1980 occupation at Gardner

This talk, by Stephen Mustchin, Lecturer in Employment Studies, University of Manchester,
focuses on engineering trade unionism, workplace conflict and strikes at the famous Eccles-based engine manufacturer L. Gardner and Sons.

Strong workplace union organisation emerged following two long strikes in 1968 and late 1972, and in 1980 a high-profile strike and occupation against mass redundancies won significant concessions. The organisation exhibited by the Gardner workforce was remarkable and represented a partial victory in a period when strikes were increasingly difficult to organise. However, retribution by the company led to the erosion of these gains demonstrating their fragility in the wider context of recession, deindustrialisation and increasingly anti-union management in the 1980s.

This talk is part of the Invisible Histories series - all welcome, admission free, light refreshments afterwards.

Thursday, 15th June 2017

19:00 – 21:00

The flame still burns: the creative power of coal

This year is the 70th anniversary of the nationalisation of the coal industry. Vesting Day for the National Coal Board was 1 January 1947.

This event is centred around a book, 'The flame still burns: the creative power of coal', which explores the sheer power of an industry which created rich, diverse cultures in the different mining communities, and continues to inspire fresh creative work today.

Granville Williams, the book's editor, will introduce a selection of films produced by the versatile and creative NCB Film Unit between 1947 and 1984.

Admission free; all welcome.

Wednesday, 21st June 2017

14:00 – 15:00

Dean Kirby talk on Angel Meadow

In this talk, journalist Dean Kirby will take listeners on a journey through the gin palaces, alleyways and underground vaults of this nineteenth century Manchester slum, which was considered so diabolical it was re-christened 'hell upon earth' by Friedrich Engels.

Dean is a national newspaper journalist who has been covering the news in Manchester and the North of England for nearly 20 years. His search for his ancestors led him to Victorian Manchester's Angel Meadow slum, where he made a remarkable discovery in the rubble of an archaeological dig. Angel Meadow: Victorian Britain's most savage slum is his first book.

This talk is part of the Invisible Histories series - all welcome, admission free, light refreshments afterwards.

Wednesday, 5th July 2017

14:00 – 15:00

Bruce Wilkinson - talk on three Lancastrian poets of the '60s

Bruce Wilkinson's new book 'Hidden culture, forgotten history: a northern poetic underground and its countercultural impact' (Penniless Press) looks at the 1960s publishing and political activities of three working class Lancastrian poets. It assesses the literary influence of Jim Burns, Dave Cunliffe and Tina Morris and traces the impact of their activism on the development of an underground still in evidence today.

The work places the trio within a long history of northern radicalism and as part of the post-war 'little poetry magazine' explosion which transmitted a wave of US experimental literature alongside British avant-garde poetry that together transformed the modern literary canon.

Original research connects the poets with the development of alternative bookshops, anti-racist associations, environmental campaigns, collectives, communes and numerous leftist organisations from the late 1960s to the early 1990s. More broadly it highlights how a wealth of non-metropolitan, British working-class culture has previously been undervalued.

Admission free.

14:00 – 15:00

Bruce Wilkinson - talk on three Lancastrian poets of the '60s

Bruce Wilkinson's new book Hidden culture, forgotten history: a northern poetic underground and its countercultural impact (Penniless Press) looks at the 1960s publishing and political activities of three working class Lancastrian poets. It assesses the literary influence of Jim Burns, Dave Cunliffe and Tina Morris and traces the impact of their activism on the development of an underground still in evidence today.

The work places the trio within a long history of northern radicalism and as part of the post-war 'little poetry magazine' explosion which transmitted a wave of US experimental literature alongside British avant-garde poetry that together transformed the modern literary canon.

Original research connects the poets with the development of alternative bookshops, anti-racist associations, environmental campaigns, collectives, communes and numerous leftist organisations from the late 1960s through to the early 1990s. More broadly it highlights how a wealth of non-metropolitan, British working-class culture has previously been undervalued.

This talk is part of the Invisible Histories series - all welcome, admission free, light refreshments afterwards.

Wednesday, 19th July 2017

14:00 – 15:00

Dave Randall talk - 'Sound System: the Political Power of Music'

'Sound System' is the story of one musician’s journey to discover what makes music so powerful. Years of touring, playing and protesting have given Dave Randall an insider’s view of the music industry, enabling him to shed light on the secrets of celebrity, commodification and culture. The book, published by Pluto Press in March 2017, finds examples of music as a force of social change as well as something that has been used to keep people in their place throughout history.

From the Glastonbury Festival to the Arab Spring, Pop Idol to Trinidadian Carnival, Randall finds political inspiration across the musical spectrum and poses the question: how can we make music serve the interest of the many, rather than the few?

Dave Randall is a musician and activist. He was the former guitarist in Faithless and has toured the world playing guitar with Dido, Sinead O’Connor and many others.

This talk is part of the Invisible Histories series - all welcome, admission free, light refreshments afterwards.

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